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Police Awam Saath Saath

Publications

Articles, publications, books, tools and other supporting materials from external sources highlighting the role of Pakistan police, community policing initiatives and need for police reforms etc.

Empowering the Pakistan Police

Thursday, February 14, 2013 In Pakistan’s struggle against violent extremism, Pakistan police officers have sacrificed their lives to save the lives of those around them. Heroic acts by the police have occurred in Peshawar, Quetta and Karachi, the cities impacted most by the spread of terrorism from the tribal areas bordering Afghanistan. In Pakistan’s cities, police are responsible for confronting the threat from extremists groups.

Coronavirus Pandemic Puts Police in the Spotlight in Pakistan

Tuesday, June 16, 2020 Police in Pakistan have found themselves in an unprecedented situation since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic earlier this year. Under-resourced and poorly trained, they have struggled to ensure compliance with public health restrictions—such as lockdowns and social distancing—against a backdrop of Pakistan’s overarching governance challenges.

Victimization, Citizen Engagement, and Policing in Lahore by Dr. Ali Cheema, Zulfiqar Hameed Jacob N. Shapiro

November 2017 The main objective of this report is to provide evidence about victimization and the costs associated with the criminal justice system that are borne by citizens of Lahore. We also review secondary evidence on the effectiveness of the criminal justice system. This analysis is important because the Government of Punjab is in the process of scaling-up a number of ambitious measures to increase the efficiency of the system and reduce its costs for victims of crime that include: the computerized complaint handling system, the automated police station record management system, the automated beat book management system, an integrated call-for-service system, a smart phone-based crime mapping app and citizen feedback mechanisms.

Citizen Trust in Police: A Puzzling Paradox by Ali Cheema and Zulfiqar Hameed

December 29, 2017 Public ratings of the police have consistently been below the ratings of other institutions in Pakistan. Only 33% of Pakistani respondents in Pew’s 2014 Global Attitudes Survey agreed that the police are exerting a good influence on the way things are going in Pakistan. This was much lower than the rating given to courts (47% agreed), the Federal Government (60% agreed) and the Pakistan Army (80% agreed). Pew’s 2009 survey found similar differences as did the Gallup survey of 2017.

Stabilizing Pakistan through Police Reform Report by the Independent Commission on Pakistan Police Reform

July 2012 The main objective of this report is to provide evidence about victimization and the costs associated with the criminal justice system that are borne by citizens of Lahore. We also review secondary evidence on the effectiveness of the criminal justice system. This analysis is important because the Government of Punjab is in the process of scaling-up a number of ambitious measures to increase the efficiency of the system and reduce its costs for victims of crime that include: the computerized complaint handling system, the automated police station record management system, the automated beat book management system, an integrated call-for-service system, a smart phone-based crime mapping app and citizen feedback mechanisms.

Pildat Policy Brief: Policy Recommendations for Police Reforms by Muhammad Ali Nekokara

Police in Pakistan lacks operational capacity and external support and hence has been unable to create desired public value. External support such as democratic governance structure, efficient criminal and evidence laws, and monetary assistance is crucial to promote professionalism in police. However, provision of even an ideal form of legislative and monetary support will not translate into substantial public good unless police leaders and managers realise their roles and build police capacity in a professional manner

Policy Recommendations for Reforms in Police System of Pakistan by Pakistan Institute of Legislative Development and Transparency

Police in Pakistan lacks operational capacity and external support and hence has been unable to create desired public Pvalue. External support such as democratic governance structure, efficient criminal and evidence laws, and monetary assistance is crucial to promote professionalism in police.

Community Policing In Pakistan: An Assessment by Muhammad Bilal Saeed, Centre for Peace and Development Initiatives

November 2014 Community policing is a philosophy as well as a strategy whereby police, with the partnership of community, identifies and searches for proactive solutions to the chronic problems faced by society. With escalating volume and enhanced complexity of crimes, compounded with inadequacy of the police in terms of funds and resources to combat societal disorders, countries around the world have experimented and recognized the potential that community policing carried over traditional policing.

Handbook on Community Policing by Centre for Peace and Development Initiatives

November 2015 CPDI has been engaged in advocating and supporting community policing in Pakistan for over a decade. Based upon our experience of conducting training programmes and research studies on community policing, we can say with confidence that there are two major hurdles in implementing community policing in the country. First is the lack of analysis into the already undertaken initiatives to find their positive aspects and shortcomings.

Community–Oriented Policing: Political, Institutional and Technical Reforms in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) Police by Bahadar Nawab, Shakir Ullah, Ingrid Nyborg and Tahir Maqsood

July 2019 Community-police relations in Pakistan are often intricate, as are their reforms. Mistrust, political intervention, meager financial resources, lack of educated/trained human resources, over-expectations and miscommunication are some of the factors contributing to weak policing and poor community-police relations. The police as a service-oriented public institution has been a demand of the public and the dream of consecutive governments. In this study, we explore the political, institutional and technical reforms taken by the government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and the police department to improve their police and policing.

Gender-responsive Policing, Excerpt from the book Local Ownership in Security: Case Studies of Peacebuilding Approaches edited by Lisa Schirch with Deborah Mancini-Griffoli and published by The Alliance for Peacebuilding

In response to violent extremist group’s attacks on religious places, military and police installations, markets, funeral gatherings and even schools, Pakistani police departments diverted training and resources away from crime prevention toward counterterrorism. The police engaged mainly male officers with negligible if any role of female police. Building public trust in police and improving public-police relations was not a priority. Close collaboration between police and army and the militarization of the police had further widened the gap between public and police leading to incidents where people took the matters in their own hands. With male officers involved in counterterrorism activities, women police could have been utilized in regular police work to improve public security.